Category: Medical Malpractice

The Distinctive Characteristics of Doctors Who Face Malpractice Claims

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Cropped image of judge hitting gavel with stethoscope in courtroom
Cropped image of judge hitting gavel with stethoscope in courtroom

Medical malpractice events don’t occur randomly, and we can learn a lot by studying statistics about how and why they occur. For instance, doctors who face multiple malpractice claims over the course of their careers tend to have certain well defined traits, according to numerous studies and statistical analyses. For instance, they tend to be older males (82%), and they specialize in areas of internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, general surgery and general practice/family medicine. Continue reading “The Distinctive Characteristics of Doctors Who Face Malpractice Claims”

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7 More Insights About the State of Medical Malpractice From New Survey

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Doctor handshake with a patientMedscape’s “Malpractice Report 2015: Why Most Doctors Get Sued” combined survey data from over 4,000 physicians to analyze the state of medical malpractice cases in the past year. Here are seven more valuable lessons to be gleaned from the survey’s results. (Part 1 of this article can be found here) Continue reading “7 More Insights About the State of Medical Malpractice From New Survey”

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7 Takeaways from Big New Survey About Medical Malpractice

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Doctor handshake with a patientOver the past year, Medscape surveyed nearly 4,000 primary care doctors and specialists to learn more about the medical malpractice lawsuits they faced. Medscape’s “Malpractice Report 2015: Why Most Doctors Get Sued” collected and organized the results. This survey provides useful information to patients and doctors about medical errors and their aftermath. Continue reading “7 Takeaways from Big New Survey About Medical Malpractice”

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Big Decline in Hospital Errors. Is Obamacare Responsible? If Not, What Is?

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Has the passage of the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. “Obamacare”) led to a meaningful reduction in fatal medical errors? If so, why, and what can we collectively learn to continue to improve treatment?

­­A report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality reviewed all types of medical mistakes, ranging from incorrect prescription dosages to errors made in medical procedures. Analysts found that 121 of every 1,000 patients in 2013 and 2014 suffered due to a medical mistake. While that rate remained the same for two years, it marked a big decrease from 145 patients in 2010 – a drop of 17 percent. Those numbers translated to big gains: 87,000 lives saved along with a savings of $19.8 billion against unneeded medical bills. Continue reading “Big Decline in Hospital Errors. Is Obamacare Responsible? If Not, What Is?”

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